Monday, September 17, 2012

Higher Ed

Prepare for the SAT.  Take a full-length proctored practice PSAT complete with results, provided free of charge by Kaplan, on :
Saturday, September 22
10:15am to 1:00pm at the Library.  
Sharpen a #2 pencil and a bring calculator to use during the test.  Students will receive a comprehensive analysis of their performance from Kaplan, detailing individual strengths and weaknesses.
To register call 978-468-5577, or email Kim Claire at kclaire@mvlc.org.

The PSAT is a preliminary version of the SAT offered to high school freshman, sophomores, and juniors.  Many students take the PSAT exam as a way to prepare for the SAT.  The PSAT is two hours and ten minutes long, with 125 questions to test math, critical reading, and writing skills.  However, the PSAT will not help with your college admissions.  Why take a test that doesn't count for college admission?  Taking the PSAT makes you automatically eligible for a scholarship from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation.  That means that the highest scoring students may win scholarship money.  The National Merit Scholarship Corporation awards over $50 million to college students.

College Related Resources in the Online Catalog:

SAT 

Fictional Fun:

Crunch Time, by Mariah Fredericks, 2005.  Four students, who have formed a study group to prepare for the SAT exam, sustain each other through the emotional highs and lows of their junior year in high school.

Hacking Harvard, by Robin Wasserman, 2007. When three brilliant nerds--Max Kim, Eric Roth, and Isaac "The Professor" Schwarzbaum--bet $20,000 that they can get anyone into Harvard  They take on the Ivy League in their quest for popularity, money, and the love of a beauty queen valedictorian.


NonFiction Fun:

Cook Your Way Through the S.A.T.: Recipes Worth a Thousand Words, by Charis Freiman-Mendel, 2011.   
A collection of 99 recipes, 100 fun-fact blurbs and 1000 vocabulary words that frequently appear on the SAT and other standardized tests.


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